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Event Info

Saturday | 26 June 2021 | 07:00 PM
Online
1 Hr 10 Mins
  • Language: English and Hindi
  • City / State: New Delhi
  • Directed By: Anurupa Roy
  • Produced By: The Katkatha Puppet Arts Trust

Mahabharata

If human beings are essentially peace-loving, why do wars take place? Does an individualistic sense of truth and justice lead to an apocalypse? Mahabharata, the eternal epic, reflects on this basic contradiction in human existence.

If human beings are essentially peace-loving, why do wars take place? Does an individualistic sense of truth and justice lead to an apocalypse? Mahabharata, the eternal epic, reflects on this basic contradiction in human existence. 

The play uses the consciousness narrative of 15 characters to explore inner dilemma and whether each character choosing differently could have averted war or are we doomed for destruction?

CAST

Anurupa Roy

Bangarakkha (Narrator)/Draupadi/Gandhari/Dushassana/Amba/Warrior who kills Abhimanyu/Karna/Kunyi/Drona

 

Mohammad Shameem

Shadow Puppets/Shakuni/Amba/Warrior who kills Abhimanyu/Drona/Karna/Ashvatthama/Dushassana

 

Avinash Kumar

Yudisthir/Shadow Puppeteer/Amba/Abhimanyu/Drona/Karna/Bhima/Jayadrata

 

Vivek Kumar

Sillakayata(Narrator)/Dushassana/Bhishma/Warrior who kills Abhimanyu/Drishtudumna/Shalya/Duryodhan

 

Gundu Raju 

Storyteller/singer/Dronacharya/Viddhashakta/Krishna/Yudishthir

 

CREW

 

Milind Shrivastava

Light Design

 

Suchet Malhotra

Original Music Score

 

Anamika Mishra

Script

 

Atul Sinha

Animation

 

Mohammad Shameem

Puppet Design & Construction

 

Asha

Assistance 

 

S. Chidambara Rao

Shadow Puppets

 

Avinash Kumar

Choreography

 

Gundu Raju

Shadow Puppets and Script Advice

This performance with puppets, masks, shadow puppets and materials looks at the Mahabharata as a dynamic narrative which has evolved over a few thousand years through the sung verses of Togalu Gombeyatta’s Sillakeyata Mahabharata and remains relevant in the new search of contemporary puppeteers. The story itself is increasingly relevant in the polarised conflict-ridden world of today. The characters then become archetypes for conflicts, small and large, whether in world politics or the family or community and the narrative is an overarching metaphor for many political, institutional, social situations in the world today. But our central question is what could have averted the Apocalyptic Mahabharata war? What choices could each character have altered? And what choices can each one of us alter? What fixed beliefs must be questioned and let go of in order to prevent such a war in the future? Can we start by acknowledging that none will survive such a war and thus it must be prevented?